4 Internet users consumed one zettabyte bandwidth in 2016

pcbuck April 22, 2021 0 Comments



4. Internet users consumed one zettabyte bandwidth in 2016.


One Zettabyte is equal to a thousand Exabytes, a billion Terabytes, ortrillion Gigabytes. By the year 2021, 82% of all IP traffic will be video,predicts Cisco.

5. 4 Billion out of the 7 Billion people on earth are already online.


InternetLiveStats (ILS) monitors the active state of the internet, and as atOctober 2018, there are 4,045,421,895 users on the web. This is expected togrow even more by the year 2020.

8. Facebook boasts of a massive 2.234 Billion users.


Approximately 30% of the world’s population is on Facebook. The socialnetworking site had 1.74 billion mobile active users in Q3 2018.Statistics suggest that around 50% of Internet users are on Facebook.Also see: How Do You Know If Someone Blocked You on Snapchat

14. 400 Hours of video contents are uploaded on YouTube Every Minute.


By the time you reached this paragraph, 1600+ hours of video content have beenuploaded to YouTube.Speaking about user engagement, the massive video sharing site serves morethan 1 Billion people every month, and an average internet user spends 4 hoursevery month on YouTube.Looking at such stats, Google has taken massive steps to protect copyrights ofindividuals by scanning over 100 years of video contents every day usingcomplex software.

16. Around 80% of the images on the internet are of Naked women.


The internet is pretty much attracted to naked ladies and explicit materials.We did a bit research on this, and the data seems believable. * 12% Of all existing websites online are NSFW. * 1 out of every three downloads is NSFW. * Sunday is the day of maximum consumption. * The online adult industry makes 3000$ a second.

19. 7 People control the whole internet.


Yes, you heard it right. There are seven people assigned to the InternetCorporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) who hold seven differentkeys. In the case of a Catastrophe, these seven people can meet again andrestore the state of the Internet.There are seven copies of the original key, in case if one of them getsmisplaced or if something goes wrong.Digital economy and society statistics – households and individuals

Internet access


ICTs have become widely available to the general public, both in terms ofaccessibility as well as cost. A boundary was crossed in 2007, when a majority(53 %) of households in the EU-27 had internet access. This proportioncontinued to increase, passing three quarters in 2012 and four fifths in 2014.By 2019, the share of EU-27 households with internet access had risen to 90 %,some 26 percentage points higher than in 2009.Widespread and affordable broadband access is one of the means of promoting aknowledge-based and informed society. Broadband was by far the most commonform of internet access in all EU-27 Member States: it was used by 88 % of thehouseholds in the EU-27 in 2019, 33 percentage points higher than the sharerecorded in 2009 (55 %) — see Figure 1.Figure 1: Internet access and broadband internet connections of households,EU-27, 2009-2019(% of all households)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_in_h)and(isoc_ci_it_h) The highest proportion (98 %) of households with internet access in 2019 wasrecorded in the Netherlands (see Figure 2), while Sweden, Germany, Denmark,Luxembourg, Finland, Ireland and Spain also reported that more than 9 out ofevery 10 households had internet access. The lowest rate of internet accessamong the EU-27 Member States was observed in Bulgaria (75 %). However,Bulgaria — together with Romania, Cyprus, Spain, Portugal and Lithuania —recorded a rapid expansion in its proportion of households with internetaccess, with increases within the range of 16-23 percentage points between2014 and 2019. Unsurprisingly, relative stability was recorded in severalMember States where household internet access was already close to saturationin 2014, such as Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Denmark; this was also thecase in Iceland and Norway.Figure 2: Internet access of households, 2014 and 2019(% of all households)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_in_h) Figure 3 shows that there is, to some extent, an urban–rural divide within theEU-27 in terms of internet access. Whereas households in cities as well astowns and suburbs had comparatively high access rates — 92 % in cities and 89% in towns and suburbs — internet access was somewhat lower in rural areas (86%). In 19 EU-27 Member States, the proportion of households in rural areaswith internet access was lower than the equivalent proportions of householdsin cities or in towns and suburbs. The divide between rural areas and the twoother types of areas was particularly strong in Greece, Bulgaria, Portugal,Slovenia and Romania, each of which had a lower overall level of internetaccess than the EU-27 average. In Germany, the share of households withinternet access was identical across the three different degrees ofurbanisation, and for the Netherlands and Denmark, almost identical (onepercentage point lower in towns and surburbs in the Netherlands and onepercentage point higher in cities in Denmark). In Belgium and Malta, towns andsuburbs recorded the highest level of internet access, and also in Slovenia,where the proportion of households in cities and towns and suburbs wasidentical. Other exceptions were Estonia, France and Luxembourg, where thehighest level of internet access was recorded in cities, but the lowest wasrecorded in towns and suburbs (rather than rural areas) and Sweden, where thehighest level of internet access was recorded in rural areas.Figure 3: Internet access in households by degree of urbanisation, 2019(% of all households)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_in_h)

Internet usage


As of the beginning of 2019, six out of seven (86 %) individuals in the EU-27,aged between 16 and 74 years, used the internet (at least once within thethree months prior to the survey date). This share was at least 90 % in tencountries, with the highest values recorded in Sweden (98 %) and Denmark (97%). By comparison, around four fifths of all individuals aged 16 to 74 usedthe internet in Croatia (79 %), while this share was around three quarters inItaly (76 %), Greece (76 %), Portugal (75 %) and Romania (74 %). The lowestshare, somewhat above two thirds, was recorded in Bulgaria (68 %).The proportion of the EU-27’s population that had never used the internet was10 % in 2019 (two percentage points lower than the year before), with thisshare falling to around one third of its level in 2009 (when it had stood at32 %).In 2019, more than three quarters (77 %) of individuals in the EU-27 accessedthe internet on a daily basis — see Figure 4 — with a further 7 % using it atleast once a week (but not daily). As such, 84 % of individuals were regularinternet users (at least weekly) of the internet. The proportion of dailyinternet users among all internet users (who had used the internet within theprevious three months) averaged 90 % in the EU-27 and ranged across the EU-27Member States from 77 % in Romania up to more than 90 % in fourteen MemberStates, peaking at 96 % in Italy, Malta and the Netherlands. Iceland (98 %)reported an even higher share of daily internet users among all internetusers. Figure 5 looks at the use of the internet while on the move, in other wordswhen away from home or work, for example, using the internet on a portablecomputer or handheld device via a mobile or wireless connection. The figurecompares 2014 data, when 48 % of individuals aged 16 to 74 within the EU-27used a mobile device to connect to the internet, with 2019 data, by which timethis share had risen to 73 %. The most common mobile devices for internetconnections were mobile or smart phones, laptops, and tablet computers.Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Luxembourg, Ireland, Austriaand France recorded the highest proportions of mobile internet use in 2019,with more than four fifths of individuals aged 16 to 74 using the internetwhile on the move, peaking at 93 % in Sweden, sharing the top rank withNorway. By comparison, between 63 % and 70 % of individuals aged 16 to 74 inPortugal, Greece, Bulgaria, Latvia, Romania and Lithuania used the internetaway from home or work, with this proportion as low as 59 % in Poland and 50 %in Italy.Figure 5: Individuals who used a portable computer or a handheld device toaccess the internet away from home or work, 2014 and 2019(% of individuals aged 16 to 74)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_im_i) One of the most common online activities in the EU-27 in 2019 wasparticipation in social networking, see Figure 6. More than half (54 %) ofindividuals aged 16 to 74 used the internet for social networking (forexample, using sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat).Between 71 % and 76 % of people in Belgium, Cyprus, Sweden and Malta usedsocial networking sites, this share peaking at 81 % in Denmark, while it roseconsiderably higher in Iceland (92 %) and Norway (86 %). At the other end ofthe scale, there were two EU-27 Member States where less than half of peopleused such sites, namely Italy and France (both 42 %).Figure 6: Individuals who used the internet for participation in socialnetworking, 2019(% of individuals aged 16 to 74)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_ac_i)

Services ordered from other individuals via the internet


In 2019, the share of individuals (aged 16 to 74) in the EU-27 who used anywebsite or app to arrange accommodation from another (private) individualduring the preceding 12 months stood at 21 %. This proportion ranged fromhighs of 46 % in Luxembourg and above one quarter of the total in Ireland,Malta and Belgium, down to less than 1 in 10 individuals in six EU-27 MemberStates, with the lowest shares recorded in Bulgaria, Romania and Slovenia (all9 %), Latvia (8 %), Czechia and Cyprus (both 5 %). Online accommodationbooking from other private individuals was more common among middle-agedpeople (aged 25 to 54) than it was among either younger (aged 16 to 24) orolder generations (aged 55 to 74). Most of these services were ordered throughdedicated websites or apps, which act as intermediaries, enabling privateindividuals to share access to accommodation services — examples includeAirbnb, Lovehomeswap or Couchsurfing.Figure 10: Individuals who used any website or app to arrange accommodationfrom another individual in the 12 months prior to the survey, 2019(% of individuals aged 16 to 74)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_ce_i) A similar analysis is presented in Figure 11, which shows the share ofindividuals who used any website or app to arrange a transport service fromanother individual. This type of service was generally less common thanarranging accommodation, but was again often conducted via dedicated websitesand apps (for example, Liftshare, UberPool or Wundercar); the average use madeof these types of service across the EU-27 by individuals (aged 16 to 74) was8 %. Among the EU-27 Member States, the share of individuals using any websiteor app to arrange a transport service in 2019 peaked in Estonia (29 %). It wascommonplace to find that fewer than 1 in 10 individuals used a website or appto arrange transport services; indeed, this situation was observed in 18Member States. Online transport booking from other individuals tended to bemore common among the younger generations (aged 16 to 24) than among olderpeople.Figure 11: Individuals who used any website or app to arrange a transportservice from another individual in the 12 months prior to the survey, 2019(% of individuals aged 16 to 74)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_ce_i)

Internet access


ICTs have become widely available to the general public, both in terms ofaccessibility as well as cost. A boundary was crossed in 2007, when a majority(53 %) of households in the EU-27 had internet access. This proportioncontinued to increase, passing three quarters in 2012 and four fifths in 2014.By 2019, the share of EU-27 households with internet access had risen to 90 %,some 26 percentage points higher than in 2009.Widespread and affordable broadband access is one of the means of promoting aknowledge-based and informed society. Broadband was by far the most commonform of internet access in all EU-27 Member States: it was used by 88 % of thehouseholds in the EU-27 in 2019, 33 percentage points higher than the sharerecorded in 2009 (55 %) — see Figure 1.Figure 1: Internet access and broadband internet connections of households,EU-27, 2009-2019(% of all households)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_in_h)and(isoc_ci_it_h) The highest proportion (98 %) of households with internet access in 2019 wasrecorded in the Netherlands (see Figure 2), while Sweden, Germany, Denmark,Luxembourg, Finland, Ireland and Spain also reported that more than 9 out ofevery 10 households had internet access. The lowest rate of internet accessamong the EU-27 Member States was observed in Bulgaria (75 %). However,Bulgaria — together with Romania, Cyprus, Spain, Portugal and Lithuania —recorded a rapid expansion in its proportion of households with internetaccess, with increases within the range of 16-23 percentage points between2014 and 2019. Unsurprisingly, relative stability was recorded in severalMember States where household internet access was already close to saturationin 2014, such as Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Denmark; this was also thecase in Iceland and Norway.Figure 2: Internet access of households, 2014 and 2019(% of all households)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_in_h) Figure 3 shows that there is, to some extent, an urban–rural divide within theEU-27 in terms of internet access. Whereas households in cities as well astowns and suburbs had comparatively high access rates — 92 % in cities and 89% in towns and suburbs — internet access was somewhat lower in rural areas (86%). In 19 EU-27 Member States, the proportion of households in rural areaswith internet access was lower than the equivalent proportions of householdsin cities or in towns and suburbs. The divide between rural areas and the twoother types of areas was particularly strong in Greece, Bulgaria, Portugal,Slovenia and Romania, each of which had a lower overall level of internetaccess than the EU-27 average. In Germany, the share of households withinternet access was identical across the three different degrees ofurbanisation, and for the Netherlands and Denmark, almost identical (onepercentage point lower in towns and surburbs in the Netherlands and onepercentage point higher in cities in Denmark). In Belgium and Malta, towns andsuburbs recorded the highest level of internet access, and also in Slovenia,where the proportion of households in cities and towns and suburbs wasidentical. Other exceptions were Estonia, France and Luxembourg, where thehighest level of internet access was recorded in cities, but the lowest wasrecorded in towns and suburbs (rather than rural areas) and Sweden, where thehighest level of internet access was recorded in rural areas.Figure 3: Internet access in households by degree of urbanisation, 2019(% of all households)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_in_h)

Internet usage


As of the beginning of 2019, six out of seven (86 %) individuals in the EU-27,aged between 16 and 74 years, used the internet (at least once within thethree months prior to the survey date). This share was at least 90 % in tencountries, with the highest values recorded in Sweden (98 %) and Denmark (97%). By comparison, around four fifths of all individuals aged 16 to 74 usedthe internet in Croatia (79 %), while this share was around three quarters inItaly (76 %), Greece (76 %), Portugal (75 %) and Romania (74 %). The lowestshare, somewhat above two thirds, was recorded in Bulgaria (68 %).The proportion of the EU-27’s population that had never used the internet was10 % in 2019 (two percentage points lower than the year before), with thisshare falling to around one third of its level in 2009 (when it had stood at32 %).In 2019, more than three quarters (77 %) of individuals in the EU-27 accessedthe internet on a daily basis — see Figure 4 — with a further 7 % using it atleast once a week (but not daily). As such, 84 % of individuals were regularinternet users (at least weekly) of the internet. The proportion of dailyinternet users among all internet users (who had used the internet within theprevious three months) averaged 90 % in the EU-27 and ranged across the EU-27Member States from 77 % in Romania up to more than 90 % in fourteen MemberStates, peaking at 96 % in Italy, Malta and the Netherlands. Iceland (98 %)reported an even higher share of daily internet users among all internetusers. Figure 5 looks at the use of the internet while on the move, in other wordswhen away from home or work, for example, using the internet on a portablecomputer or handheld device via a mobile or wireless connection. The figurecompares 2014 data, when 48 % of individuals aged 16 to 74 within the EU-27used a mobile device to connect to the internet, with 2019 data, by which timethis share had risen to 73 %. The most common mobile devices for internetconnections were mobile or smart phones, laptops, and tablet computers.Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Luxembourg, Ireland, Austriaand France recorded the highest proportions of mobile internet use in 2019,with more than four fifths of individuals aged 16 to 74 using the internetwhile on the move, peaking at 93 % in Sweden, sharing the top rank withNorway. By comparison, between 63 % and 70 % of individuals aged 16 to 74 inPortugal, Greece, Bulgaria, Latvia, Romania and Lithuania used the internetaway from home or work, with this proportion as low as 59 % in Poland and 50 %in Italy.Figure 5: Individuals who used a portable computer or a handheld device toaccess the internet away from home or work, 2014 and 2019(% of individuals aged 16 to 74)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_im_i) One of the most common online activities in the EU-27 in 2019 wasparticipation in social networking, see Figure 6. More than half (54 %) ofindividuals aged 16 to 74 used the internet for social networking (forexample, using sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat).Between 71 % and 76 % of people in Belgium, Cyprus, Sweden and Malta usedsocial networking sites, this share peaking at 81 % in Denmark, while it roseconsiderably higher in Iceland (92 %) and Norway (86 %). At the other end ofthe scale, there were two EU-27 Member States where less than half of peopleused such sites, namely Italy and France (both 42 %).Figure 6: Individuals who used the internet for participation in socialnetworking, 2019(% of individuals aged 16 to 74)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_ac_i)

Services ordered from other individuals via the internet


In 2019, the share of individuals (aged 16 to 74) in the EU-27 who used anywebsite or app to arrange accommodation from another (private) individualduring the preceding 12 months stood at 21 %. This proportion ranged fromhighs of 46 % in Luxembourg and above one quarter of the total in Ireland,Malta and Belgium, down to less than 1 in 10 individuals in six EU-27 MemberStates, with the lowest shares recorded in Bulgaria, Romania and Slovenia (all9 %), Latvia (8 %), Czechia and Cyprus (both 5 %). Online accommodationbooking from other private individuals was more common among middle-agedpeople (aged 25 to 54) than it was among either younger (aged 16 to 24) orolder generations (aged 55 to 74). Most of these services were ordered throughdedicated websites or apps, which act as intermediaries, enabling privateindividuals to share access to accommodation services — examples includeAirbnb, Lovehomeswap or Couchsurfing.Figure 10: Individuals who used any website or app to arrange accommodationfrom another individual in the 12 months prior to the survey, 2019(% of individuals aged 16 to 74)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_ce_i) A similar analysis is presented in Figure 11, which shows the share ofindividuals who used any website or app to arrange a transport service fromanother individual. This type of service was generally less common thanarranging accommodation, but was again often conducted via dedicated websitesand apps (for example, Liftshare, UberPool or Wundercar); the average use madeof these types of service across the EU-27 by individuals (aged 16 to 74) was8 %. Among the EU-27 Member States, the share of individuals using any websiteor app to arrange a transport service in 2019 peaked in Estonia (29 %). It wascommonplace to find that fewer than 1 in 10 individuals used a website or appto arrange transport services; indeed, this situation was observed in 18Member States. Online transport booking from other individuals tended to bemore common among the younger generations (aged 16 to 24) than among olderpeople.Figure 11: Individuals who used any website or app to arrange a transportservice from another individual in the 12 months prior to the survey, 2019(% of individuals aged 16 to 74)Source:Eurostat(isoc_ci_ce_i)

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